Increased Weight Reduces The Brain’s Response To Tasty Food. Part 3 of 3

Increased Weight Reduces The Brain’s Response To Tasty Food – Part 3 of 3

The question for dieters, then, is whether the caudate response can be restored to normal if they lose weight. The researchers said they didn’t distinguish but planned to test that.

Research in people with other addictions suggests that, over time, there may be some return to normalcy in the brain’s reward processing but perhaps never a unabated return to where you started.

A second study to be presented at the meeting found that that the brains of obese people responded differently than the brains of normal weight people to anticipated food or monetary rewards and punishments.

It found that abdominous individuals showed greater brain sensitivity to anticipated reward and less sensitivity to anticipated negative consequences than normal-weight people. The study was done by researchers at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Because the findings from both studies were to be presented at a medical meeting, they should be viewed as overture until they are published in a peer-reviewed journal.

About 30 percent of the U.S. population is classified as obese, and the medical consequences of that cost more than $100 billion annually, said Dr. Nora Volkow, maestro of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse and an expert on the neurobiology of obesity.

One of the primary culprits behind obesity is the constant availability of “excessively advantageous food” that, when eaten often, may alter the brain’s reward system scriptovore.com.

“It’s increasingly being recognized that the brain itself plays a fundamental role in obesity and overeating”.

Parts: 1 2 3

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